FPC, PO Box 370, Auburn, CA 95604; (530) 823-0706, E-mail info@fpcmag.com

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The News follows! (Scroll Down for Calendar Items.)

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Featured Websites

Relmark Group — Risk Management Advocates for Fire Sprinkler Contractors
Relmarkgroup.com


Source for Designers:

Need Designers?
    You’re invited to meet the exceptional graduates of Seneca College.
    For job posting e-mail or fax job descriptions to Fax: 416-494-9178
Scott.Pugsley@senecacollege.ca


* Counterfeit Sprinkler Warning *

Counterfeit UL Mark on Fire Sprinklers
    The following is a notification from UL that the fire sprinklers, identified below, bear counterfeit UL Certification Marks for the United States and Canada. The fire sprinklers have not been evaluated by UL to the appropriate Standards for Safety and it is not known if the fire sprinklers comply with any safety requirements.
    Although the fire sprinklers are marked TY3151, TY3251, and TY3351, the fire sprinklers were not manufactured or labeled by TYCO Fire & Building Products.
    Name of Product: Models TY3151, TY3251, and TY3351.
    The products are marked with a counterfeit UL Certification Mark and the following on the deflector and “TYCO” on the wrench boss and may be provided with an orange guard that also bears a counterfeit UL Mark. The counterfeit fire sprink­lers employ a thermo bulb marked “JOB F5” or “YD05”: TY3151 155°F 68°C SU; TY3251 155°F 68°C SP; TY3251 200°F 93°C SP; TY3351 155°F 68°C HSW.
    Photographs of the product can be found at: www.ul.com/newsroom.
    These counterfeit fire sprinklers were found in the United Arab Emirates. UL has received previous reports of counterfeit for Models TY3151 and TY3251 in Vietnam.
    To learn more see Release No. 18PN-20 and Release No. 15PN-21 at: www.UL.com.

    Also see Release 18PN-21 and 18PN-22: The following is a notification from UL that the fire sprinklers, identified below, bear counterfeit UL Certification Marks for the United States and Canada. The fire sprinklers have not been evaluated by UL to the appropriate Standards for Safety and it is not known if the fire sprinklers comply with any safety requirements.
    Although the fire sprinklers are marked GL5661 and GL5651, the fire sprinklers were not manufactured by Globe Fire Sprinkler.
    Product Models: Models GL5661 and GL5651
    The products are marked with a counterfeit UL Certification Mark and “GLOBE” on the wrench boss. The counterfeit fire sprinklers employ a thermo bulb marked “JOB F5” and may be provided with an orange guard.
    Photographs of the product can be found at: www.ul.com/newsroom.
    The fire sprinklers have been found in the United Arab Emirates. UL has not received reports of these counterfeit sprinklers in other locations.
    Product Models: Models GL5661 and GL5651
    The products are marked with a counterfeit UL Certification Mark and “MAFCO” on the wrench boss. The counterfeit fire sprinklers employ a thermo bulb marked “JOB F5” and may be provided with an orange guard.
    Photographs of the product can be found at: www.ul.com/newsroom.
    These fire sprinklers have been found in the United Arab Emirates. UL has not received reports of these counterfeit sprinklers in other locations.
    To learn more see Release No. 18PN-21 and 18PN-22 at: www.UL.com.

UL Warns of Counterfeit Fire Sprinklers (Release 17PN-05)

The following is a notification from UL that the fire sprinkler identified below bears a counterfeit UL Mark for the United States. The fire sprinkler has not been evaluated by UL to the appropriate Standard for Safety and it is unknown if it complies with any safety requirements.
    Although the fire sprinkler wrench boss is marked “TYCO,” the fire sprinkler was not manufactured by Tyco Fire & Building Products.
    UL Warns of Counterfeit UL Mark on Fire Sprinkler (Release 17PN-05)
    Visit: www.ul.com/newsroom/publicnotices

UL Warns of Counterfeit Fire Sprinklers (Release 17PN-08)

The following is a notification from UL that the fire sprinkler identified in the link below bears a counterfeit UL Mark for the United States. The fire sprinkler has not been evaluated by UL to the appropriate Standard for Safety and it is unknown if it complies with any safety requirements.
    Although the fire sprinkler wrench boss is marked “GLOBE,” the fire sprinkler was not manufactured by Globe Fire Sprinkler Corporation.
    UL Warns of Counterfeit UL Mark on Fire Sprinkler (Release 17PN-08)
            Visit: www.ul.com/newsroom/publicnotices

UL Warns of Counterfeit Fire Sprinklers (Release 14PN-9)
    The following is a notification from UL that the fire sprinklers identified bear counterfeit UL Certification Marks for the United States and Canada. The fire sprinklers have not been evaluated by UL to the appropriate Standards for Safety and it is unknown if the fire sprinklers comply with any safety requirements.
    Although the fire sprinklers wrench boss is marked "TYCO" and the thermo bulbs are marked "JOB F5" the fire sprinklers were not manufactured or labeled by Tyco and the thermo bulbs were not manufactured or labeled by Job, GmbH., affiliates or agents.
    Name of Product: Upright TY3151; Pendent TY3251; Horizontal Sidewall PS007.
    Location: The sprinklers have been found in Vietnam and India. UL has not received reports of these counterfeit sprinklers in other locations.
    Identification: On the product: The product bears counterfeit UL and TYCO Marks and the following information on the upright TY3151 sprinkler. (Location - Vietnam)
    Counterfeit Fire Sprinkler Markings include: UL in a circle, 155°F/68°C, TY3151; "TYCO" cast into both sides of the wrench boss; Deflector material zinc plated steel (magnetic); 5mm glass bulb -Job F5.
    Authentic Fire Sprinkler Markings include: cULus in a circle, 155°F/68°C, SU, TY3151; "TYCO" incised on one side and the year of manufacture on the opposite side of wrench boss; Defector material brass with chrome or painted white (non-magnetic); 5 mm Geissler glass bulb - "G" between two triangles on one side and lot number on the other side.
    For more information and to see photographs go to www.ul.com.

http://www.ul.com/global/eng/pages/newsroom/publicnotices/detail/index.jsp?cpath=/global/eng/pages/newsroom/publicnotices/detail/data/ul-warns-of-counterfeit-fire-sprinklers-release-14pn-9_20140515101700.xml

UL Warns of Counterfeit Fire Sprinkler
    The following is a notification from UL that the fire sprinkler identified below bears a counterfeit UL Certification Mark for the United States and Canada. The fire sprinkler has not been evaluated by UL to the appropriate Standards for Safety and it is unknown if the fire sprinkler complies with any safety requirements.
    Although the fire sprinkler’s wrench boss is marked “TYCO”, the fire sprinkler was not manufactured by Tyco, its affiliates, or agents.
    Name of Product: Pendent Type Fire Sprinkler
    Identification: On the product: The counterfeit sprinkler has the UL Mark on the wrench boss. The UL Certified Tyco sprinkler is provided with the UL Mark on the deflector, other differences are:
    Counterfeit Fire Sprinkler Markings: “TYCO” and “UL” marked on the sides of the wrench flat, no date code; cULus in a circle marked on the side of the frame. “68C” and  “SSP” on the deflector without TY number; Deflector material zinc plated steel (magnetic); 5mm glass bulb no markings.
    UL Certified Fire Sprinkler Markings: “TYCO” marked on one wrench flat, date code on the other wrench flat; cULus in a circle, “155°F/68°C”,”SP” and “ TY3251” marked on the deflector; Deflector material brass with chrome or painted white (non-magnetic); 5 mm Geissler glass bulb – “G” between two triangles on one side and lot number on the other side.
    To see photographs visit: http://ul.com/newsroom/publicnotices/ul-warns-of-counterfeit-fire-sprinkler-release-no-14pn-18/.
    Location: The sprinklers have been found in India. UL has not received reports of these counterfeit sprinklers in other locations.

National
UL & LPCB Warn of Counterfeit Fire Sprinkler
    The following is a notification from UL and the Loss Prevention Certification Board (LPCB) to distributors, contractors, fire departments, regulatory agencies, and authorities having jurisdiction that the fire sprinkler identified below bears a counterfeit UL Certification Mark for the United States and Canada, and a counterfeit LPCB Mark. The fire sprinkler has not been evaluated by UL or LPCB to the appropriate Standards for Safety and it is unknown if the fire sprinkler complies with any safety requirements.
    For more information please see the following links:
http://www.ul.com/global/eng/pages/newsroom/publicnotices/detail/index.jsp?cpath=/global/eng/pages/newsroom/publicnotices//detail/data/ul-and-loss-prevention-certification-board-lpcb-warn_20130329121900.xml

http://www.ul.com/global/eng/pages/newsroom/publicnotices/detail/index.jsp?cpath=/global/eng/pages/newsroom/publicnotices//detail/data/ul-warns-of-counterfeit-ul-mark-on-fire_20130131080000.xml


News: (Scroll down for Calendar Items.)

California
Alert: California Contractors & Fitters
    Paulene Norwood, Executive Director of the Sacramento Valley Chapter of the American Fire Sprinkler Association said: “We need your assistance in informing sprinkler contractors and fitters who hold California state required Fitter Licenses to be informed that they are required to complete 30 hours of Cal Fire-OSFM approved courses by June 30, 2021. OSFM is the Office of the State Fire Marshal.
    Norwood continued, “Phone calls I am receiving regarding this from non-members is they were not aware of this requirement and they were not informed. Many are asking, ‘Why are there no notices in supply houses?’”
    Norwood has contacted fire sprinkler suppliers and fabricators asking for their help in getting the word out.  
    She noted that the “…manufacturers and suppliers are a direct line to all contractors and fitters in our area and are a good source to inform them of this requirement through direct contact with them and at your places of business.” 
    Norwood added, “These licensed contractors are your lifeline and must remain in business, and to do so, they must meet all the Cal Fire-OSFM requirements for license holders. No license, no business, closed doors.”
    Following are the regulations from the OSFM website:
  Continuing Education — Certified Fire Sprinkler Fitter shall complete three units of American National Standards Institute/International Association of Continuing Education and Training (ANSI/IACET) accredited continuing education within a three-year period. This requirement is verified by CAL FIRE-OSFM every three years at time of renewal. If proof of completion is not received at time of renewal on the third year of the three-year period, the Certified Fire Sprinkler Fitter shall be required to reapply as a new applicant, pay all associated fees, and pass a written examination.
    The “three units” is the equivalent of 30 hours of class time.
    This is a requirement for renewal of the Fitter License.
    Following are the details from Cal Fire-OSFM on the new deadline for required CEUs for Fitter License holders.  
Note: this is from the “Period of Initial Certification,” not the renewal date.
    Period of Initial Certification requirement (Every 3 years): July 1, 2017-June 30, 2019; July 1, 2019-June 30, 2020.
    First date of renewal with CEU requirement: July 1, 2021, July 1, 2024.
    Second date of renewal with CEU: July 1, 2022, July 1, 2025.
    The Sacramento Valley Chapter of the American Fire Sprinkler Association held approved CAL FIRE-OSFM seminars on November 14, 2019, offering .08 credits towards the stated requirement. The seminar was limited to 100 attendees and was open to members and non-members.
    FPC will try to give notice of future seminars; check fpcmag.com for notices received after press time.
    For more information contact: Paulene Norwood, Executive Director, Sacramento Valley Chapter, American Fire Sprinkler Association, (916) 296-0635.


News Affecting the Fire Sprinkler Industry

National
Construction Input Prices Jump 24%
    A new analysis tracks the materials that have skyrocketed the most since last year, including softwood lumber, which is up 154%.
    An article by Jennifer Goodman published June 16, 2021, on www.constructiondive.com, said new data from the federal government sheds light on what most U.S. contractors already know: Materials prices are skyrocketing. Nonresidential construction input prices increased 23.9% in May compared to the previous year, according to an Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data released. These input prices are 4.8% higher than in April.
    In addition, all three energy subcategories registered significant year-over-year price increases. Crude petroleum has risen 187%, while the prices of unprocessed energy materials and natural gas have increased 100% and 90%, respectively. The price of softwood lumber has expanded 154% over the past year.
    “The elevated prices will not decrease anytime soon,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu. “While global supply chains should become more orderly over time as the pandemic fades into memory, global demand for inputs will be overwhelming as the global economy comes back to life.”
    Basu said the surge in prices is probably temporary as suppliers work to boost capacity and bolster output.
    Nevertheless, some of the inflationary pressure contractors and others are experiencing may not be over soon, he said, and inflation and interest rates may not be as low during the decade ahead.
    “There are some things that have changed during the pandemic and will not shift back,” said Basu. “For instance, money supply around the world has expanded significantly. Governments have been running large deficits.”
    Commercial and residential builders have struggled with the higher materials prices since this time last year. The National Association of Home Builders reported that lumber costs are adding an average of $35,872 to new single family home prices.
    Despite the skyrocketing materials prices, contractors expect sales to rise over the next six months, according to ABC’s Construction Confidence Index. This means project owners who delayed the onset of construction for a few months in order to secure lower bids may come to regret that decision, Basu said.

National
ABC to Senate: The PRO Act Is a Wolf in Sheep’s...
    Ahead of the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions’ hearing on the Protect the Right to Organize Act, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) released the following statement.
    “The PRO Act legislates away the basic employer and employee freedoms and choices that create long-term careers and make the construction workforce safer and more productive,” said ABC Vice President of Legislative and Political Affairs Kristen Swearingen. “Make no mistake: the PRO Act is a wolf in sheep’s clothing, and the American public deserves to know that it is nothing more than an attempt to strip workers of their privacy, freedom, and choice.
    “Among the many harmful provisions in this dangerous piece of legislation, the PRO Act tips the scales against workers and small businesses in union elections, eliminates basic employer and employee rights, and imposes unbearable burdens on job creators,” said Swearingen. “Lawmakers must fully reject this bill and instead focus on creating legislative solutions that offer more freedom for workers to achieve their career dreams, not eliminating their choices. The workforce, and America, wins when people have that choice.”
    For more information visit: www.abc.org.  

National
ABC: Labor Rule Disappointing, But Not Surprising
    The Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) released the following statement on the U.S. Department of Labor’s rescission of the Joint Employer Status Under the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    “While we certainly saw this coming, it is still disappointing the Biden administration rescinded the 2020 joint employer final rule,” said Ben Brubeck, ABC Vice President of Regulatory, Labor, and State Affairs. “ABC supported the prior final rule because it promised to bring additional clarity to a confusing area of the law, help alleviate unnecessary barriers to and burdens on contractor and subcontractor relationships throughout the construction industry, reduce needless litigation, and encourage innovation in the economy.” 
    Background: The joint employer final rule promised to make the joint employment test narrower and more focused and went into effect on March 16, 2020. In February 2020, 18 states sued DOL in federal court to strike down its joint employer final rule, and in September 2020 a U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York judge ruled that parts of the final rule were illegal. A business coalition that includes ABC intervened in the case, in part to defend the construction industry against unwarranted attacks by the state plaintiffs on the industry’s long-established methods of doing business. The case is currently on appeal to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals.
    Associated Builders and Contractors is a national construction industry trade association established in 1950 that represents more than 21,000 members. Founded on the merit shop philosophy, ABC and its 69 chapters help members develop people, win work, and deliver that work safely, ethically, and profitably for the betterment of the communities in which ABC and its members work.
    For more information visit: www.abc.org.
 
Maine
Schools Lack Fire Sprinklers
    According to an article by Hannah Catlin posted July 28, 2021, on www.bangordailynews.com, Maine, nearly half of Maine’s K-12 schools do not have sprinkler systems, and more may have old, incomplete, or otherwise compromised fire suppression systems, according to Maine Department of Education estimates.
    In a survey of Maine superintendents on the status of their facilities, 56% reported their schools had sprinklers, DOE Communications Director Kelli Deveaux said. But neither the DOE nor the Fire Marshal’s office has an exact list of which of the state’s 715 schools have fire suppression systems, which have outdated systems, and which are unprotected.
    School fires are most likely to happen during the day and during the school year, when buildings are at peak occupancy, the National Fire Protection Association found. But with the prohibitive cost of fire suppression and no broad mandate to fix all educational buildings with such systems, Maine’s aging schools remain vulnerable.
    The state’s most recent school fires — which both occurred on July 25 — had two completely different outcomes, at least in part because one had a fire suppression system and the other did not.
    Westbrook High School, which had sprinklers, ended up with smoke and water damage from an early morning blaze, but remains structurally sound. Less than two hours later, Dr. Levesque Elementary School in Frenchville, which did not have sprinklers, was totally lost to fire.
    Westbrook Fire Chief Andrew Turcotte credits the building’s sprinkler system with saving the school. Turcotte is also a certified fire inspector and fire investigations technician. He said he has never responded to a fatal fire where sprinklers were deployed.
    “If the sprinklers had not been activated at the Westbrook school fire, instead of one room that was involved, we probably would have had multiple rooms that were fully involved and fire would have most likely gone through the roof by the time we got there,” Turcotte said. “I can tell you for certain the school would not be opening this month or next month.”
    More than half of Maine’s K-12 schools were built in the 1950s or earlier, Deveaux said, and many of these buildings have not had major upgrades since the state adopted the National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code in the early 1990s.
    New educational facilities in Maine have been required for 30 years to incorporate automatic sprinklers, and the code now requires schools to include emergency lighting, ramps and at least two exits on each floor.
    But older schools like Dr. Levesque Elementary, built in 1964, have been grandfathered into state fire codes, and do not have to comply with these newer safety standards.
    This is at least in part because retrofitting a building with a modern fire suppression system is so expensive. While there were no plans to add sprinklers to the school at the time of the fire, Frenchville Fire Chief Peter Parent said he’d heard the cost of retrofitting other buildings in the area was upward of $25,000.
    Schools regularly find themselves squeezed between their safety priorities and their wallets, Turcotte said.
    “This is not uncommon given the age of many schools in our state and given the lack of funding to improve the facilities, including updating life safety systems,” Turcotte said. “And this puts many school districts in difficult positions because while they would like to add these systems, they have to often choose between adding a new fire alarm system, sprinkler system, new boiler or roof, or keeping a math or art teacher or possibly losing a sports or humanities program.”
    Gov. Janet Mills has added $63 million to the DOE’s School Revolving Renovation Fund, which Deveaux said she hopes will help old schools upgrade their buildings in coming years.
    Turcotte said he hoped the fires at Westbrook and Dr. Levesque would be an eye-opener for the state and its school districts.
    “A building can be rebuilt from fire, smoke, and water, but you can never bring someone back,” he said.

Minnesota
Sprinklers in High-Rise Apts. by 2033
    According to an article by John Croman posted July 15, 2021, on www.kare11.com, St. Paul, Minnesota, public housing agencies in Minnesota will have 12 years at the most to add fire sprinklers to older residential towers, as part of a bill lawmakers passed in June.
    Rep. Mohamud Noor, the chief author of the sprinkler bill in the House, started working on the issue on November 27, 2019, the same day five of his constituents lost their lives in an early morning fire at Cedar High apartments.
    “We should not have waited for that incident to happen,” Rep. Noor, a Minneapolis Democrat, told KARE.
    The fire broke out in the bedroom of an apartment on the 14th floor of the high-rise building and quickly spread to other units. Investigators found some fault with seals that had been added to doors, but agreed lives could’ve been spared in the public housing complex had been equipped with automatic fire suppression system.
    “We should’ve taken care of the residents, knowing that was a hazard, and that the City of Minneapolis, the Minneapolis Public Housing Authority knew about it,” Noor said.
    Automatic sprinklers have been required in residential high-rise buildings since 1992. But most of public housing complexes in Minnesota were built decades before that rule went into place.
    The St. Paul Housing Authority retrofitted all of its residential towers over a period of several years, so that agency is already in compliance. The Minneapolis Public Housing Authority has retrofitted 16 of its 42 buildings and is in the process of adding sprinklers to 10 other buildings, at the cost of $9 million.
    “This is about saving lives and property, so this is a step forward,” Noor remarked. “But we still need to also address the privately-owned buildings that were not included in this bill.”
    Senate Republicans resisted placing the 2033 deadline on private building owners because of the financial hardships it might create for them. Noor has asserted out those owners would save money in the long run because their fire insurance bills would drop.
    For the public buildings, the big challenge will also be funding.
    The bill set a deadline to complete work, but didn’t include money to help pay for it. Housing authorities will be looking to local, state, and federal agencies for grant money.
    The federal government’s retreat from public housing funding has left those systems struggling with the cost of maintenance in aging buildings. By one estimate, public housing authorities nationwide are $70 billion behind on repairs, because the federal government has paid about one-tenth of what was originally pledged.
    The Minneapolis Public Housing Authority has a backlog of $152 million in capital improvement projects.
    Noor said that he and fellow lawmakers are exploring options to make high-rise sprinkler projects eligible for state public works infrastructure funding streams, but he said the federal government needs to step up a play more of a role too.
    “That obligation lies with the federal government to make sure we address the safety of all residents that live in high-rise building, to make sure we retrofit those buildings based on the code that we already have.”

Nevada
Arson Fire Stopped by Sprinklers
    An article by Caroline Bleakley posted April 5, 2021, on www.8newsnow.com, Las Vegas, Nevada, said fire investigators believe a recent fire at the Walmart Supercenter was “intentionally set.”
    The fire started just before 8:00 p.m. in the rear of the store in the paper towel aisle, creating a large amount of smoke. According to Las Vegas Fire & Rescue, automatic fire sprinklers quickly helped douse the flames.
     When fire crews arrived at the scene, people were already in the process of evacuating the store. One person was injured when they tripped and fell during the evacuation. That person was treated by paramedics and taken to the hospital.
    Damage was estimated at $200,000, mostly due to smoke damage. Structural damage was estimated at less than $10,000. Firefighters and employees worked quickly to control water damage.


Fire Sprinkler Calendar:

September 28, 2021
26th Illinois Burn Prevention
Golf Invitational
Benefits IL Fire Safety Alliance & More
Mistwood Golf Club, Romeoville, IL
(815) 557-6961, IBPAGolf@gmail.com, www.ILBurnPreventionAssoc.com

September 30, 2021
NFSA Boston Golf Outing
Benefits Burn Centers
Plymouth C.C., Plymouth, MA
www.nfsa.org

October 3-9, 2021
Fire Prevention Week
Plan to Promote Sprinklers!

October 8, 2021
6th Common Voices Golf Classic
Benefits Common Voices
Bear’s Best, Las Vegas, NV
Abby Gunnells, (615) 405-8027
agunnells@nfsa.org

October 12-15, 2021
Family Governance Virtual Forum
www.thefbcg.com

October 13, 2021
28th AFSA VA Burn Survivors Golf
Benefitting Burn Survivors Foundations
Williamsburg NGC, Williamsburg, VA
AFSA VA Chapter,George Wagner
wagnerg@mindspring.com
www.afsavirginia.com

October 18, 2021
32nd FSCATX Charity Golf Classic
Benefits Scottish Rite Children Hospital
Brookhaven CC, Farmers Branch, TX
Sarah Kiefer, (512) 844-6632
sarah@fscatx.org, www.fscatx.org

October 18, 2021
NFSA Connecticut
Chapter Golf Tournament
Benefits Burn Centers
Blue Fox Run G.C., Avon, CT
www.nfsa.org

October 21, 2021
CRFSA Chapter Meeting
Capitol Region Virtual Meeting
www.nfsa.org

October 24-28, 2021
Hawk’s Cay 2021
Florida Fire Sprinkler Assoc. Conference
www.floridafiresprinkler.com

October 25, 2021
LFSA 15th Golf Tournament
Benefitting American Red Cross
Santa Maria Golf Course
Baton Rouge, LA
www.lafiresprinkler.com

October 27-28, 2021
20th Int’l Water Mist Conference
Warsaw, Poland
International Water Mist Association
www.iwma.net

October 28, 2021
22nd Bob McCullough
Golf Tournament
Benefits Fire Safety Education
Chateau Elan, Braselton, GA
bobby@atlantasprinkler.com
www.georgiafiresprinkler.org

November 19, 2021
Gary Wennes Memorial
Golf Tournament
Benefits the Arizona Burn Foundation 
The 500 Club, Phoenix, AZ
Matthew Virtue, Victaulic Company
Matthew.Virtue@Victaulic.com

December 7, 2021
GFSA Christmas Gathering
Benefits Toys for Tots
Hamilton Mill, GA
bobby@atlantasprinkler.com
www.georgiafiresprinkler.org

Week of April 25, 2022* (New date)
NFSA North American Sprinkler Expo
Cosmopolitan, LasVegas, NV
www.nfsa.org

June 20-25, 2022
Interschutz Expo 2022
Hannover, Germany
www.interschutz.de

*FPC plans to attend.

Other Dates by Organization

Academy of Fire Sprinkler Technology
www.firesprinkleracademy.com

American Fire Sprinkler Association
www.firesprinkleracademy.org
Beginning Sprinkler System Planning School:
July 19-30, Baltimore, MD
Aug. 16-27, Baton Rouge, LA
Sept. 27-Oct 8, Exton, PA
Nov. 8-19, Dallas, TX

American Subcontractors Association:
www.asaonline.com

Canadian Automatic Sprinkler Association
www.casa-firesprinkler.org

Visit the website for more about CASA Conference & Expo, Online & Live Virtual Training, Certification Learning Paths, On-Site Training, State-approved continuing education, and Webinars from CASA

July 5-6: The Know How for Fire Sprinkler System Acceptance, Virtual Seminar
July 7-8: Understanding, Applying, and Enforcing NFPA 25, Virtual Seminar
Oct. 4-5: Understanding, Applying, and Enforcing NFPA 13D, Virtual Seminar
Oct. 6-7: Seismic Protection for Fire Sprinkler Systems, Virtual Seminar

Fire Tech Productions:
www.firetech.com

Inspection & Testing
of Sprinkler Systems
July 20-22, 2021, Greand Rapids, MI
Aug. 17-19, 2021, Indianapolis, IN
Sept. 21-23, 2021, Atlants, GA
Fire Sprinkler Systems
Service & Repair Workshop
Nov. 2-5, 2021, Indianapolis, IN

National Fire Protection Assoc.:
www.nfpa.org

NFPA 13, Standard for Installation of Sprinkler Systems (2019) Live Virtual Training
July 12-16
Oct 4-8

National Fire Sprinkler Assoc.:
www.nfsa.org

Hands on ITM Training
Aug. 3-4, 2021, Richmond, KY
Sept. 22-23, 2021, Exton, PA
Advanced Topics in Codes
and Standards, Virtual Training
Nov. 9, 2021

(TT) = Tech Tuesday
June 15: 2021 Updates to the I-Codes, WebinarTT

Other Future Meeting Dates:

AFSA, www.firesprinkler.org
Sep. TBD, 2022, Las Vegas, NV

CASA, www.casa-firesprinkler.org

NFPA, www.nfpa.org
June 6-9, 2022, Boston, MA

NFSA, www.nfsa.org  
May 3-6, 2022, Clearwater Beach, FL
May 3-6, 2023, Washington, D.C.
May 7-10, 2024, Maui, HI

Also Visit:
American Fire Sprinkler Association
www.firesprinkler.org  
National Fire Sprinkler Association
www.nfsa.org  
National Fire Protection Association
www.nfpa.org  
BlazeMaster®
www.blazemastertraining.com   
Fire Tech Productions
www.firetech.com
FMI
www.fminet.com  
Oklahoma State University
www.ce.ceat.okstate.edu
Seneca College, School of Fire Protection
www.senecacollege.ca


 

FPC's Question of the Month

Who do you consider to be fire sprinkler allies?

Please tell us about it, and include your name, co. name, city, & state. Please tell us what you think!
Please send your reply today. Also, please send photos, and advise us if you wish to remain anonymous.


Featured Websites

Relmark Group — Risk Management Advocates for Fire Sprinkler Contractors
Relmarkgroup.com

"NFPA’s Fire Sprinkler Initiative" website: NFPA’s Fire Sprinkler Initiative

Helpful Website:
    The Building Code Resource Library website may be of interest! It is an electronic library on building fire protection at your fingertips.

    Website: http://buildingcoderesourcelibrary.com/

Fire Protection Educational and Training Resources:
Fire Smarts, LLC

Fire Sprinkler History:
"History of Mather & Platt Ltd." (And Grinnell) By Marcel Boschi + David Drew-Smythe: http://home.zipworld.com.au/~lnbdds/Boschi/

Certification: "The National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies (NICET)" For more information, visit theNICET website.

"Fire Sprinkler Coalition" For more information, visit the IRC Fire Sprinkler Coalition website.

"Campus FireWatch" For more information, visit the Campus FireWatch website.

"Fire Sprinkler Academy" For more information, visit the Fire Sprinkler Academy website.


Take Heart
Remember what Jesus said: “I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” -
John 16:32-33, New International Version


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Updated January 21, 2021 by Tami Collins

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